Social competence and environment

Why are not all children equally responsive to variations in the social environment?

Most children develop well and find their way into society without many problems, but not all children manage to do so. We know that this difference is related to a combination of the child’s disposition and the environment in which he or she is raised. We want to understand the role of brain development herein, how children’s chances for thriving are determined by their parents, and how we can better guide children’s development.

The Leiden Consortium on Individual Development (L-CID) is an ongoing large-scale longitudinal intervention study in which 500 families with same-sex twins are followed over a six year period. L-CID was initiated at Leiden University and is now a collaborative project between Erasmus University Rotterdam (PI: Eveline Crone), Leiden University (PI: Lara Wierenga) and VU University Amsterdam (PI: Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg).

L-CID has a cohort-sequential design with two cohorts: an early childhood cohort (ECC), aged 3-4 at wave 1, and a middle childhood cohort (MCC), aged 7-8 at wave 1. Annual assessments consist of alternating lab- or home visits during which behavioral and neurobiological data are collected. We are currently collecting data of the sixth wave of the ECC and the fifth wave of the MCC.

The collected data allows, among others, for testing which child characteristics shape the effect of (manipulated) environmental factors. The aim of L-CID is twofold:

  1. To investigate the development of social competence and behavioral control in children between 3 and 14 years old
  2. To dissect the reason why not all children are equally responsive to variations in the social environment.
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Our Team:

Eveline Crone

Eveline Crone

Professor

Eveline Crone is full professor of neurocognitive developmental psychology at the Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences.

Michelle Achterberg

Michelle Achterberg

Postdoctoral Researcher

Michelle is a postdoc interested in longitudinal brain development, social information processing and behavioral control.

Lina van Drunen

Lina van Drunen

PhD Candidate

Lina is a PhD Candidate studying Individual differences in environmental and genetic effects on structural brain development.

Dorien Huijser

Dorien Huijser

Lab and Data manager

Dorien is our lab manager and plays a big role in our transition to open science.

Simone Dobbelaar

Simone Dobbelaar

PhD Candidate

Simone is a PhD Candidate studying the role of social environment in the neurocognitive development of social competence.


Our collaborators:


Funding:

L-CID is part of the National Consortium on Individual Development (CID) which is funded by a ‘Gravity’ grant of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science.

For more information on the national consortium see: www.individualdevelopment.nl.


Learn more about our research: